Pass the Butter!: Scandinavian Breads and Pastries // June 22nd-23rd

Pass the Butter!: Scandinavian Breads and Pastries // June 22nd-23rd

225.00

Growing up in Minnesota, it seemed to Brennan Johnson like there wasn’t much regional food worth holding onto: Jello salads and hot-dishes were something to run away from rather than savor. But in looking into his own family’s ancestry, largely Swedish with Norwegian influence as well, Brennan saw that there were older, much more intriguing foods underlying this cuisine. In this two-day class we’ll take a look at many of the Scandinavian breads and pastries—both from his own family’s recipes and from other sources—that he’s been on a mission to recreate.  We’ll focus on two types of rye bread, one hearty loaf perfect for the open-faced sandwiches we’ll have for lunch, and a sweeter, spiced holiday bread. We’ll also tap into the magic of a basic cardamom dough and explore its many uses, from buns to braids and more.

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Instructor: Brennan Johnson

Dates: June 22nd & 23rd, 9am-3:30pm

Brennan’s fascination with food culture and history was catalyzed by a trip to Western Europe in 2009 to study communal brick ovens. He began baking bread soon after, baking out of his father’s own brick oven and selling at local farmers markets during his high school summers. He has a degree from Whitman College in Environmental Humanities—which for him meant exploring our culture’s relationship to food—and he has worked in restaurants and bakeries in San Francisco, Portland, and Asheville. The Walnut Schoolhouse is, for him, a way to piece together those disparate experiences, combining his curiosity in food studies with his love of hands-on cooking.

Brennan’s fascination with food culture and history was catalyzed by a trip to Western Europe in 2009 to study communal brick ovens. He began baking bread soon after, baking out of his father’s own brick oven and selling at local farmers markets during his high school summers. He has a degree from Whitman College in Environmental Humanities—which for him meant exploring our culture’s relationship to food—and he has worked in restaurants and bakeries in San Francisco, Portland, and Asheville. The Walnut Schoolhouse is, for him, a way to piece together those disparate experiences, combining his curiosity in food studies with his love of hands-on cooking.